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Technology Management

“Evaluate the technology management processes for the different environments that need to be supported in the organization, including development, test, production, and staging areas. The assessment needs to be done in terms of the following:

  • How effective was the product selection process?
  • How effective were the vendor negotiations?
  • Were there problems with the vendor service-level agreements?
  • What feedback have the product vendors provided in terms of working with the organization? Payment terms? Accessibility? Cultural fit?
  • How well do we configure our products?
  • Is the financial process related to purchasing products too long? Too short?
  • What mistakes were made in the technology product selections?
  • Did we select any bad vendors? Have any gone out of business? Which ones have broken commitments to us?
  • Which vendors have proven themselves to us? Can we negotiate an attractive ongoing relationship with them?
  • How do we validate that the appropriate architectures have been selected?
  • How do we maintain the reliability and performance of the architectures in the future?”

Resource Management

“Other resources, in addition to managing people resources and technology resources, also need to be managed. These resources include floor space, desks, and other equipment. Here are some questions to consider:

  • Are we limiting our effectiveness by the controls in place in this area?
  • Were team members able to get the tools they need to do their jobs?
  • Is the working environment improving individual performance?
  • Are people complaining about our resource management policies? How much time is this taking out of their workday?
  • Did the project rescue require modifications to corporate policies in order to be able to deliver successfully? Has this been communicated to executive management? Is it being considered for the future corporate standards?
  • What else have we learned in this area from the rescue initiative?”
Closing Perspective“This section closed the loop for the project rescue initiative. The intensity of a project rescue operation cannot and should not be sustained indefinitely. After a troubled project is rescued, the team needs to return to standard project management principles. This section cited the Project Management Institute (PMI) and other industry best practices as potential alignment candidates.